With Thanksgiving always comes Black Friday

If you choose to venture out during this time, be safe both financially and physically.
Check out these 9 safety tips to help your shopping experience go a little bit easier!

…. Happy Shopping!

  1. Construct a separation plan for you and your shopping partner(s), especially if you’ve got kiddos with you! Choose a spot to always meet when you’ve lost one another. Instruct your children to reach out to a security office or an employee to have them accompany your child while they walk to your spot you’ve previously agreed upon.
  2. Do not pull out your form of payment at the register until you have been completely rung up. You never know who may be nearby, scoping you out and attempting to steal your credit card numbers and/or see that you have a lot of cash.
  3. Ponder ways to substitute a common form of payment. Like using prepaid cards for transactions to prevent your identity and bank account from being stolen by hackers.
  4. Only buy as much as you and your shopping partner(s) can carry. You can be immediately considered a target by someone searching for overwhelmed shoppers.
  5. Check your bank statements immediately and regularly after your shopping. Save all of your receipts and compare to your statements to make sure you aren’t a victim of fraud.
  6. Carry your keys, or method of safety (such as pepper spray, etc) in your hand and mentally prepare yourself to use it if needed when you are approaching your vehicle.
  7. Before you enter your vehicle when heading back from shopping (or anywhere during this season) be sure to peak under your vehicle, and inside the back and front seats before unlocking and entering. Try to only unlock the specific doors needed if your car will allow it. This prevents anyone from sneaking in on the other side of your vehicle. Also, keep this in mind when pumping gas at gas stations.
  8. Carry your purse or wallet tightly and closely to your body. This will hinder the opportunity for thieves to pickpocket.
  9. Do not leave packages or gifts visible in your vehicle. Hide it in the trunk, or take it home as immediate as possible.

 

 

Because the human head weighs between 12-15 pounds (5.44-6.80 kg), the neck and upper back muscles must constantly work to maintain an upright posture. Due to our use of computer and electronic devices, many people have forward head posture (FHP), meaning their head rests forwards on the neck more than it should. In fact, studies show that every inch of FHP places an additional 10 pound (4.53 kg) burden on the muscles in the upper back and neck to keep the head upright. It’s no wonder why a common complaint is, “My head feels so heavy and my neck feels compressed—I constantly have to rest my head on the back of the couch when I sit.” So, what can we do about this?

POSTURE: Reducing FHP is essential. To do this, tuck in your chin (creating a “double chin”) and speak as you do this. You will notice a change in your voice quality—HOLD for ten seconds and then release JUST ENOUGH for the voice to clear and try to KEEP this position throughout the day. It takes about three months to retrain old bad posture habits so be patient!

SLEEP: If your neck is narrower than your head (the case for most of us), your pillow needs to be thicker on the edge to support your cervical spine.

ACTIVITY: You may have to assess which activities (such as sports) are most important to you and either modify how you do it and/or change when and how long you engage in such actions. If your goal is to improve in an activity, gradually increase the frequency, intensity, and duration over time. If you hurt and can’t recover within a “reasonable” time frame (such as 24-48 hours), then you overdid it.

Chiropractic offers MANY therapeutic tools to help those with neck pain, which include spinal and extremity manipulation, soft tissue therapy, physical therapy modalities (like ultrasound), nutritional counseling, and exercise training. Your doctor of chiropractic can give you advice on sleeping posture and prescription pillows, home cervical traction options, and more. The goal is not only to manage your neck pain, but more importantly,  to teach you self-management strategies so YOU can control of this often disabling condition and reduce the need for prolonged care.

Many of us have had problems associated with dizziness from time to time and have not thought much about it. But when dizziness happens frequently, lasts a long time, or is severe, it definitely gets our attention and forces us to get it checked out.

BACKGROUND: To determine how common dizziness is and the personal burden it imposes on the population, a large-scale study examined 2,751 adults (aged 50+ years) using multiple measures for dizziness, hearing, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and quality of life. An alarming 60% reported some type of vertigo. Interestingly, the researchers observed an association between tinnitus and vertigo. Also, the participants with vertigo reported lower quality of life scores than those without dizziness complaints. This study highlights the significant burden imposed by dizziness/vertigo stating that this is an “important public healthcare issue” that must be studied further.

CAUSES: The most common causes include benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), acute vestibular neuronitis or labyrinthitis, Meniere’s disease, migraine headaches, and anxiety disorders. Less commonly, reduced blood flow to the brain/head (“vertebrobasilar ischemia”) and retrocochlear tumors can cause dizziness. The risk also increases with age.

TREATMENT OPTIONS: Most vertigo sufferers do not require extensive testing and can be treated in the clinic.  Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and labyrinthitis are most often successfully managed by doctors of chiropractic with specific exercise to reposition the displaced “canaliths” or small stone-like material in the inner ear.

Treatment with a low-salt diet and diuretics (herbal options include: dandelion, ginger, parsley, hawthorn, and juniper) can also be helpful in resistant cases with fewer side effects than prescription vestibular suppressing medications. Consuming potassium-rich foods such as bananas, avocados, raisins, beans, squash, mushrooms, potatoes, yogurt, or fish is often wise when taking a diuretic. Chiropractors often provide nutritional counseling and can help guide you in this area as well.

 

Low back pain (LBP) can arise from a number of structures that comprise the lower back like the intervertebral disk, the facet joints, the muscles and/or tendon attachments, the ligaments that hold bone to bone, the hip, and the sacroiliac joint (SIJ). Though several of these can generate pain simultaneously, the focus of this month will center on the SIJ.

The role of the SIJ is quite unique, as it has a big job: it is the transition point between the flexible axial skeleton (our spine) and the pelvis, below which are the lower extremities or legs. The pelvis supports the weight of the torso, which usually accounts for about two-thirds of our body weight. The SIJ is shaped at an oblique angle that diverges or opens at the front and converges inwards at the back of the joint in order to support the weight on top of it. Because the sacrum/tailbone is “V” shaped, it fits like a wedge and is held together with very strong ligaments, making it an inflexible but sturdy joint.

Making a diagnosis of SIJ syndrome or identifying it as a pain generator can be a challenge. Your chiropractor may depend on several types of examinations in order to arrive at an SIJ syndrome diagnosis, such as palpation looking for pain directly over the SIJ; compression tests of the pelvis; front-to-back hip movements to stretch the joint; and imaging, such as x-ray, CT scans, and MRI.

Since the SIJ is NOT a flat and smooth oblique joint, x-ray has many limitations. However, the pubic bone called the “symphysis pubis” (SP), which is located in the front of the pelvis, can be easily seen on x-ray. Because the pelvis is a ring-like structure, an SP that is out of alignment may indicate SIJ dysfunction.

In a recent study, two independent orthopedic surgeons analyzed the x-rays of 20 consecutive patients (17 women and 3 men) with proven SIJ dysfunction and LBP (confirmed by SIJ injection testing), which resulted in the findings of osteoarthritic degeneration and subluxation (misalignment) in 18 of the 20 subjects.

When they assessed the SP in 20 non-SIJ LBP control subjects (16 women and 4 men), 7 had abnormal SP findings (35%) versus 18 of 20 with SIJ-LBP mentioned above (90%). A review of the patients’ past radiology reports found that only three reports mentioned this in the SIJ-LBP group and none reported this in the control group. The authors concluded that SP findings are underreported by radiologists, and because SP is much easier to “read” or assess than the SIJ itself, it NEEDS to be looked at!

Content Courtesy of Chiro-Trust.org. All Rights Reserved.

 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is also becoming a “hot topic” as it relates to motor vehicle collisions (MVC). The question is: how often is TBI missed?

The simple answer is: FREQUENTLY! This is due to the fact that attention is often drawn toward other injuries such as a neck injury or a limb injury. One study found that doctors were more likely to miss an mTBI diagnosis in patients who had sustained an arm or leg fracture. Among a total of 251 trauma patients, only 8.8% were diagnosed with mTBI at the time of injury vs. 23.5% who were eventually diagnosed at a later date. The authors of the study note the importance for healthcare providers to not be overly focused on the most obvious injury, as it may result in missing an mTBI diagnosis and the opportunity for early management of the condition—potentially leading to greater pain, suffering, and long-term disability.

But how “good” is our ability to assess mTBI? In a recent study on the ability of sideline assessments to predict subsequent problems after a sport-related concussion, researchers concluded that although sideline measures are useful for diagnosing concussion, they are not suitable for determining the extent of injury one to two weeks post-injury.

Part of the problem associated with concussion, regardless of cause, is an overall lack of knowledge about the condition on the part of athletes, parents, coaches, and medical professionals. In a Canadian survey of members of these groups, “predictors” of better concussion knowledge included prior personal experience or history of concussion. Factors affecting knowledge included language, age, educational level, annual household income, and TBI history.

Yet another issue is the “under reporting” of concussion. Looking at gender differences in a total of 288 athletes across 7 sports (198 males, 90 females), in spite of having similar knowledge about concussion, female athletes were more likely to report their concussive symptoms than males.

Sobering facts: 1) About 1.7 million cases of TBI occur in the US annually, and approximately 5.3 million live with a disability caused by TBI; 2) Annual direct and indirect TBI costs are estimated at $48-56 billion; 3) Among children under fourteen years of age, TBI results in 2,685 deaths and 37,000 hospitalizations; 4) Between 50-70% of TBI accidents are the result of a motor vehicle crash.